Tag Archives: travel

Tips for better hosting from a pair of Airbnb junkies

The following is an excerpt from an article that appeared in BrickUnderground and was written by Michelle Slade, who is a freelance copywriter and editor. She’s the author of “Airbnb Pro” – a guidebook full of tips and techniques to help you find the best Airbnb accommodation at the best prices. She also blogs at makingitanywhere.com. These tips were specifically written for Airbnb hosts.

1. Respond to reservation requests speedily. Hosts in all other cities respond on time — and they do so politely. You, on the other hand, take about three weeks to message back with “mayb.ill think bout it an let u no.”

2. Don’t be mean when it comes to using your air conditioning in the summer. I’m talking to you, host #1 who emailed us daily to check on our a/c use, and you, host #2 who had post-its all over the walls reminding us to keep it off unless strictly necessary. It’s 100 fricking degrees outside; it’s necessary, okay?

3. Warn us that if we turn on the TV while drying our hair, the fuse will go (and of course, there’s no access to the fuse box because it’s behind three locked doors in the basement). 43.

4. Be honest about just how many stairs we’ll have to climb to reach your apartment. When we’re lugging around two suitcases, a kettle and a microwave (yes, we really did that), six flights isn’t “just a short walk up.” Normal people might not have so much random luggage, but they might have a knee problem or a fear of heights… or something.

5. Leave us a smidgen of storage space for our stuff — even if it’s just a collapsible clothes rail that you bring out when guests stay. When we’re staying in a shoebox and we have to store our clothes on the floor, arguments about “foot sweat marks” ensue.

6. Provide us with basic instructions for the apartment, so that we don’t end up hassling you with phone calls. For example, tell us any strategies for opening the front door if it has a particularly cumbersome lock. Let us in on the wifi password. And inform us where our trash should go on the street (it’s not always obvious).

7. Don’t be afraid to e-mail/phone and make sure everything’s going well. Airbnb is different from hotels: it’s meant to create a sense of community and reciprocity. We won’t feel harassed if you check in with us — and we understand that you’ll be a bit worried about leaving your apartment with strangers.

8. Don’t leave embarrassing medication in your bathroom cabinet: we end up wasting a lot of time hypothesizing about what could have possibly led to your “condition.”

Airbnb Is ‘Good for Lonely People’

I found an interesting quote from Barry Diller reprinted by Peter Kafka in All Things D.

It’s certainly an interesting point, because – as many of us know — just the idea of traveling alone can be enough to dissuade many people from leaving home. Services such as Airbnb, Wimdu, Bookings, and HomeAway may be more enticing options to those who otherwise would have chosen not to travel outside their comfort zone.

Airbnb Is Good for Lonely People, Says Barry DillerNOVEMBER 15, 2013 AT 10:37 AM

Peter Kafka / All Things D

Airbnb is primarily additive. I don’t think it’s stealing much share from urban hotels. I think it’s serving people who didn’t travel because they were scared, or couldn’t afford it, or use it because it’s an antidote to loneliness. A room in someone’s house is not as valuable as a room at the Helmsley.

IAC’s Barry Diller, whose portfolio includes both Expedia and Match.com, talking to Bloomberg Businessweek.

It’s certainly an interesting point, because — as many of us know — just the idea of traveling alone can be enough to dissuade many people from leaving home. Services such as Airbnb, Wimdu, Booking and HomeAway may be more enticing options to those who otherwise would have chosen not to travel outside their comfort zone.

Citi Bike discount on Groupon

Citi Bike is currently available at up to a 57 percent discount via Groupon. This discount can be a welcome thing for guests visiting the city.

Riders can pick up a bike in the East Village and pop over to Midtown to gaze at Rockefeller Center’s tree or Macy’s holiday window displays.

Citi Bike, operated by NYC Bike Share, is New York City’s new bike share system that was introduced on Memorial Day. Members can enjoy unlimited 30-minute rides between the stations. The bike-share program includes 332 stations scattered every few blocks throughout Manhattan below 59th Street and in Brooklyn neighborhoods including Williamsburg, Clinton Hill and Brooklyn Heights.

Groupon’s discount includes four options:

24-Hour Pass Options
$15 for three 24-hour passes ($29.85 total value)
$45 for ten 24-hour passes ($99.50 total value)

Seven-Day Pass Options
$25 for two 7-day passes ($50 total value)
$64.98 for six 7-day passes ($150 total value)